Custom prop controls for code components

You can create components with custom prop controls.

First, note that you may not need custom controls! If all you want is to show a dynamic set of options in a dropdown, or conditionally show/hide fields, you can use prop control functions.

When registering your component, specify type: ”custom” and a React copmonent that renders the control.

A minimal example:

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// A code component that just renders the prop
const CodeComponent = ({ customProp, className }) => <div className={className}>{`${customProp}`}</div>;
// A prop control with the value and a button to update it
const CustomProp = ({ updateValue, value }) => (
<div
style={{
width: '100%',
display: 'flex',
justifyContent: 'space-between',
padding: '0px 10px 0px 10px'
}}
>
<span>Value: {`${value}`}.</span>
<button onClick={() => updateValue(!value)} style={{ background: 'lightgray', padding: '0px 5px 0px 5px' }}>
Change
</button>
</div>
);
// Registration
PLASMIC.registerComponent(CodeComponent, {
name: 'CodeComponent',
props: {
customProp: {
type: 'custom',
control: CustomProp
}
}
});

The props passed to the custom control component are:

  • componentProps: The props that were passed to the component
  • contextData: The data from setControlContextData(). See prop control functions.
  • value: The current value passed to the prop.
  • updateValue: The callback function to update the value to be passed to the prop.
  • FullscreenModal and SideModal: Modal components if the control needs more space (covering either the center of the entire screen, or just the right pane—see next section).

A shorthand if the prop registration doesn’t need to specify any other metadata is to provide the component directly:

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PLASMIC.registerComponent(CodeComponent, {
name: 'CodeComponent',
props: {
customProp: CustomProp
}
});

Showing modals

To show a modal, use FullscreenModal or SideModal. These take an onClose callback, which is fired if users click outside.

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const CustomControl = ({ FullscreenModal }) => {
const [open, setOpen] = useState(false);
<div
style={{
width: '100%',
display: 'flex',
justifyContent: 'space-between',
padding: '0px 10px 0px 10px'
}}
>
<button onClick={() => setOpen(true)} style={{ background: 'lightgray', padding: '0px 5px 0px 5px' }}>
Edit
</button>
<FullscreenModal show={open} onClose={() => setOpen(false)}>
<div>More UI here!</div>
<button onClick={() => setOpen(false)}>Close</button>
</FullscreenModal>
</div>;
};

Usage notes

The controls run inside the Plasmic Studio UI, which is running in a different document/iframe than your application/your app host.

This has a few current implications:

Context from your app host won’t be there. If your components need context (e.g. for styling), for now you will need to wrap each component, like so:

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function StandardContexts({ children }) {
return (
<ThemeProvider>
<SomeOtherProvider>{children}</SomeOtherProvider>
</ThemeProvider>
);
}
function CustomProp1(props) {
return <StandardContexts>...</StandardContexts>;
}
function CustomProp2(props) {
return <StandardContexts>...</StandardContexts>;
}

And, styling must be provided explicitly. Things will be fine if you are using a CSS-in-JS solution that dynamically injects styles into the document, but if you need external stylesheets to be loaded, then you will need to include and manage those yourself.

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